Color always seems to be a little bit richer and deeper in the fall. From food to fashion, nature to home decor, the season is filled with wonderfully rich shades.

As you look for a new wig shade to try, let fall be your guide. Here are a few colors to get you inspired by the season.

 

 

Fall is right around the corner. So step into the season with a fabulous new style. Need a few ideas to help you shop? Here’s some inspiration to get you started!

Hello, Wig Lovers!

Over the last few months, we’ve recieved reports about our videos being used in other retailers’ ads or posts on Facebook. We want you to know that we appreciate your loyalty and we’re grateful to all of you who have called this out. It feels good knowing that you have our back. We have yours as well. So please, please, PLEASE be careful when you’re shopping online. Don’t assume that we’re working with a retailer just because you see a familiar face featured in an ad. For instance, we all know and love Taz. These places know that as well. That’s why they’ve resorted to using our content to lure you in. So remember this…if you click on an ad and it doesn’t direct you to Cysterwigs.com, you are not dealing with us. Also know that we don’t work with other sites to sell our products. Everything you need can be found at Cysterwigs.com.

Again, please be careful out there. We want you to get the great wig styles you’re looking for, but we don’t want you buying inferior products or getting ripped off. Be smart and go with your gut. If it looks weird and doesn’t feel right, that’s an automatic hard pass.

Thank you for your support and we wish you a happy and safe shopping experience.

Be sure to check out Taz’s statement below.

Best,

devon

 

 

From a client email:

Where I live it can get windy and while I don’t go for long walks or anything outside in the wind, I’m worried they’ll tangle excessively walking to/from stores, etc. What do most girls wearing these wigs do about this? Is there a way to best prevent it or will they untangle quite easily? I searched online but it seems most info is about the wig not blowing off in the wind, versus being a tangled mess.

 

 

That’s an amazing question!

I generally recommend protecting your wig from the wind by applying a scarf, cap, or even a hoodie over the hair when in those situations. If you let the hair fly around loose, each strand bangs into another. This causes static build-up. Static is the enemy of your wig, regardless of what it’s made of.

Static causes the hair to stick together, which speeds up tangling. We do not recommend driving in the car with the window down, riding a bike, sitting in front of a fan on high, or any other activity that will blow the hair around violently for this reason. In these situations — and any other like it — you will want to gently restrain or cover the hair to prevent it from blowing around as much as possible. 

Another thing we recommend is the liberal application of a silicone-based product such as our Simply Stylin’ serum to help act as a buffer and anti-static measure.

 

This is an excerpt from our CysterWigs Knowledge Base. Check it out on our private site to see over 500 articles all about our store, wigs, and how to wear the hair!

 

Medication is designed to treat a variety of health conditions, but sometimes they can have unwanted side effects – including changes to your hair. Certain medicines can contribute to excess hair growth, changes in hair color or texture, or even hair loss.

 

Medication-induced hair loss, like any other type of hair loss, can have a real effect on your self-esteem. The good news is that in most cases, it’s reversible once you stop taking the medication.

How do drugs cause hair loss?

Medicines cause hair loss by interfering with the normal cycle of hair growth. This growth cycle has three phases:

  • During the anagen phase, which lasts for around three to four years, the hair grows.
  • During the catagen (transitional) phase, which lasts two to three weeks, the hair prepares for the telogen phase.
  • During the telogen phase, which lasts about three months, the hair rests and older hairs are shed and replaced by newer hairs.

Medications can lead to two types of hair loss:

Telogen effluvium is the most common form of medication-induced hair loss. It usually appears within two to four months after taking the medication. This condition causes the hair follicles to go into their resting phase (telogen) and fall out too early. People with telogen effluvium usually shed between 100 and 150 hairs a day.

Anagen effluvium is hair loss that occurs during the anagen phase of the hair cycle when the hairs are actively growing. It prevents the matrix cells, which produce new hairs, from dividing normally. This type of hair loss usually occurs within a few days to weeks after taking the medication. It’s most common in people who are taking chemotherapy medications and is often severe, causing people to lose most or all of the hair on their head, as well as their eyebrows, eyelashes and other body hairs.

The severity of medication-induced hair loss depends on the type of medication and dosage, as well as your sensitivity to that medicine.

What types of medications cause hair loss?

Many different types of medicines are thought to cause hair loss, including some of the following types of medications:

  • Acne medications
  • Antibiotics and antifungal medications
  • Antidepressants
  • Oral contraceptives
  • Blood thinners (anticoagulants)
  • Cholesterol-lowering medications
  • Immunosuppressant medications
  • Chemotherapy medications
  • Epilepsy medications (anticonvulsants)
  • High blood pressure medications (anti-hypertensives)
  • Hormone replacement therapy – estrogen or progesterone for women, androgens and testosterone for men
  • Interferons
  • Mood stabilizers
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications ( NSAIDs)
  • Parkinson’s disease medications
  • Steroids
  • Thyroid medications

Chemotherapy medications often lead to the anagen effluvium type of hair loss. As these kill cancer cells throughout the body, they can also damage healthy cells, including hair matrix cells. The hair typically starts to fall out after the second cycle of chemotherapy. Hair loss is more common and severe in patients taking combinations of chemotherapy medications than in those who take just one medication.

This is an excerpt from our CysterWigs Knowledge Base. Check it out on our private site to see over 500 articles all about our store, wigs, and how to wear the hair!