How Can I Tell if A Wig Has Permatease?

 
Click to subscribe to the CysterWigs blog in your favorite reader app

If you click on “Click Here to See More” in the Highlights section, it will extend the product description and one of the grey boxes at the bottom under “The Gist” will let you know if the style has permatease.

Here is how it looks with a style with permatease:

And here is how it looks for a style that does not have permatease:

You can see that there is no box that states there is permatease in the wig.

I hope this information has been helpful for you!


This is an excerpt from our CysterWigs Knowledge Base. Check it out on our private site to see over 500 articles all about our store, wigs, and how to wear the hair!


PS: Do you have a customer service inquiry? No worries – our Client Care Help Desk Team is here for you M-F, 10 am until 6 pm (ET). Just fill out this form right here:

How to revitalize deflated permatease

 
Click to subscribe to the CysterWigs blog in your favorite reader app

What you’ll need:

a virgin toothbrush with firm bristles

holding spray (if your wig is synthetic, make sure it’s synthetic safe!)

a styrofoam head

T-pins

sectioning clips or bobby pins

wide-toothed comb

a small pair of sharp scissors

1. Use T-pins to pin the wig right-side-in (so the hair is facing you, not the inside of the cap) on the styrofoam head. I generally put t-pins at the nape, forehead, ear tabs, and crown. Make sure wig is nice and secure before moving on to step 2.

2. Use the wide-toothed comb to gently brush the hair back, directly off the face, to best expose any wefts on the top of the head and / or crown that you want to fluff up.

3. Use sectioning clips or bobby pins to separate the individual wefts.

4. Look on the underside of the weft, near the bottom, where it is sewn into the cap. This is where the permatease lives! Moving in small horizontal strokes, take the virgin toothbrush and “saw” back and forth with gentle pressure. This will help fluff up the permatease again.

5. Continue throughout the areas of the cap that you want to fluff up.

NOTE: It’s okay if it seems like you are fluffing things too much. You can always tame things back down at the end. “More is better” is generally the way to go when you do this.

6. Flip the wig upside-down and spritz with the hair spray. Allow to dry.

7. Remove from styrohead. Now that everything is nice and fluffy, use your fingers to style the wig as you want it to look.

8. Trim any obnoxious fly-aways with the scissors. (Carefully.)

That’s it!

This technique works particularly well with Rene of Paris and Noriko wigs. I use it on my Amal and Cameron wigs to squeak a few more months out of them, since (for example) the biggest issues with ROP wigs tend to be permatease failure issues and not the fibers getting frizzy. Give this a whirl and see if it helps you too! 🙂


This is an excerpt from our CysterWigs Knowledge Base. Check it out on our private site to see over 500 articles all about our store, wigs, and how to wear the hair!

Is there a way to decrease the amount of permatease in a wig?

 
Click to subscribe to the CysterWigs blog in your favorite reader app

From a YouTube comment:

Hi Heather, I have a Reese by Noriko but can’t wear it because of the perma-tease. It looks like I’m wearing a football helmet, lol. Anything I can do to decrease this perma-tease?

Well, in all seriousness, the best way to do this is to avoid buying permateased wigs. Now, I know that sounds like a gigantic cop-out, but it really isn’t. Here’s why:

Decreasing the permatease in this wig will cause it to lie flat. In a style like Reese, that will completely change the entire style of the wig. That wig is supposed to be a voluminous, layered shag.

If you were able to remove the permatease completely, such as by steaming it straight or by – YIKES! – pulling it out (which I have heard people have done!), you would find the wig completely unwearable. It would be destroyed, because the permatease not only gives the wig body, but it hides the wefts on the top of the cap. Without it, those tracks can easily become exposed, which is a common problem with wigs with lighter amounts of permatease.

Some companies that make wigs with smaller amounts of permatease in the cap (like Jon Renau, for instance) strongly advise against moving the part in the hair from where it is when you get your wig, because that is usually the only part of the wig with enough permatease to cover the tracks on the top of the cap well enough so that the wefts don’t show through. They don’t do this to be cheap or chintzy, mind you. They do this because so many customers demand wigs with minimal amounts of permatease, and they are simply responding to that demand the best way they can.
Remember: Permatease is a key structural component of any wig where you find it, just like the monofilament is in a mono wig.

So while you can steam it to flatten it out, or apply a bunch of styling product to the top of your wigs to keep flyaways under control, you’ll want to accept these for what they are.

In this specific example, Noriko wigs are ALWAYS kind of voluminous and rounded. That and layering are what that brand is known for, honestly. (Though at one time, they were also known as pioneers in rooted coloring on synthetic hair . . . but now everyone does it!) The Amore line is a much better bet if you want to stay within that color palette and away from the permatease poof. Just remember, there’s no way to get the kind of volume you’ll find in a wig like Reese WITHOUT that permatease, so all of the Amore wigs (which are mono top) will be a little flatter and conservative by comparison. 😉

This is an excerpt from our CysterWigs Knowledge Base. Check it out on our private site to see over 500 articles all about our store, wigs, and how to wear the hair!


Product Listing:
Reese by Noriko