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Synthetic-safe care products will not damage the human hair in these blended-fiber wigs, but human-hair products may damage the heat-friendly synthetic fiber of the blend. We recommend that you use the same care techniques that you would for synthetics, since that material generally makes up about 70% of the wig.

Heather’s personal care routine for these wigs:

Use just a little fabric softener in lukewarm water and swish the hair around. There is no need for any scrubbing or harsh chemicals.

Rinse by filling a basin with clean, cold water and gently swishing. Repeat until water is clear.

Condition with a leave-in conditioner, such as Jon Reanu’s HD Smooth Detangler.

You may also want to consider using a silicon spray (like the Simply Stylin’ spray in our store) to restore the protective silicone anti-static coating on the hair between washings.

Gentle is the name of the game for keeping these wigs looking their prettiest!


This is an excerpt from our CysterWigs Knowledge Base. Check it out on our private site to see over 500 articles all about our store, wigs, and how to wear the hair!

Part 3. It’s a great idea to try a low density wig as your first wig.

Well I just finished up my very first full year of wearing wigs! It has been QUITE a journey and I’ve learned what works and what doesn’t work for me. Here’s another thing that I’ve learned during the past year.

Most of my friends knew I started wearing wigs due to alopecia. But people who I didn’t see on a regular basis couldn’t help but notice the TOTAL change in density of my hair. So I was questioned quite a bit. I was always honest and open with my hair loss, and had no problem explaining that I started wearing wigs. I also knew that not everyone would be comfortable with me telling them about my wigs. This is why I suggest that first-time wig owners look into some low density options for your first wig!

For years, wig manufacturers have used permatease when making wigs. The permatease is there for a reason. It actually gives the wigs have some style and lift, but the main reason it’s there is to ensure that no one sees the wefts of hair on wigs. It helps disguise some of the wefts when you style your wig.

Although permatease and high density in wigs can be helpful for styling and disguising wefts, it also makes it look like you have a LOT of hair. In some cases it can even cause your wig to look wiggy. Some people prefer permatease. Especially long-time wig wearers because they’re used to buying wigs when high density and permatease wigs were all that were available from wig manufacturers.

Well, the times have changed and wig manufacturers have caught on to the fact that many new wig wearers these days want ultimate realism when it comes to wearing wigs. This is where low density wigs have come into play. Low density wigs have little to no permatease and sometimes just have less fibers sewn into the wig as well. The low density helps the wigs look more natural since it’s closer to most people’s bio hair density. This makes the transition to wearing wigs a little easier since a low density wig will more closely match the hair density you had prior to hair loss. Low density wigs are also less detectable to the the untrained eye, aka, people who might be more prone to ask questions about your new hair.

Sometimes, wigs with lower density must be carefully styled since there is a greater chance of “weft visibility” if the fibers aren’t perfectly placed. Please keep this in mind if you are interested in a lower density wig.

So in a nutshell, low density wigs might make transitioning from no wigs/bio hair to wearing wigs much easier! Give it a try!

Here is a link to low density wigs at Cysterwigs:

My personal low density favs:
Arrow by Ellen Wille
Code Mono by Ellen Wille
Arya by Tony of Beverly
On Edge by Gabor (Make sure to watch the youtube reviews on this style! It looks much different than the manufacturer’s photos)
Codi XO by Amore


You can see all of Rachel’s posts here. Part one of the series is located here and part two is here.

I have heard over and over again…oh I can’t wear long hair or oh I look awful in short hair. Oh I wish I could wear this or that. One of the biggest reasons we feel we can’t wear a certain length wig is our idea of what looks good on us. Most often its because we never had anything but the length we feel comfortable in. In my case I have super baby fine bio hair. BW (before wigs 😉) I wore pixies most of the time. Mainly because my hair didn’t look good in longer styles. Notice I said my hair didn’t look good not me.
I have experimented on lengths and colors for the last two or so years that I have been wearing wigs and have come to the conclusion that you can wear any length within reason..lol) What you need to know and understand is your face shape. Then you can choose lengths and styles that balance your face shape. Below (images 2 & 3 ) is CysterWigs easy way to measure and determine your face shape.

Its fun and easy to determine your face shape and you might be surprised with the results.

Its not only fun to find celebrities who have your face shape it helps you verify yours.

Wearing Mia by TressAllure in Sunset Glow

Now I have an oblong face shape. Basically an oblong face is an elongated oval face shape. Oval is the ideal shape. My face doesn’t scream out oblong at first glance. She isn’t super long and you might be thinking but aren’t oblong faces thin? Not necessarily. Your face shape has nothing to do with your weight or how fat your face is. A little fyi…you don’t see this straight on view (image 5) from me very often. I prefer a three quarter view…why you ask? Again its a balance thing and a three quarter view makes my face appear more oval. Measurements are important. As I remeasured the length of my face for this blog I realized its 4.5” not 4.25” like I always thought. So take your time to get accurate measurements.

It helps to know all your head measurements. One that I know I had been taking the wrong way for quite awhile until I saw Heather’s video was my ear to ear measurement. I think I had originally measured barely 11” which is really really small. After viewing Heathers video I measured and my ear to ear is 12.5” which is between a child and petite size. Soooo yeah I know my head is fairly flat up front. (insert intelligence joke here 😂) So in my finding wigs that look good on me balancing this out is also important.

Above in image 6 are some stills from Heathers video. Its pretty self explanatory how not to measure. Lol Fyi… I originally measured over top like the photo of Heather in the upper left of image 6.

In image 7 Heather demonstrates the right way to take your ear to ear measurement. Measure about 7” from your hairline to your crown. Now take the tape rotate it and keeping the tape at your crown measure from the bottom of your sideburn (this would be the bottom of the ear tabs on a wig) to your other sideburn.

I have found to balance my oblong face I need volume on the sides. This breaks up the straight line I have by softening or obscuring this line. A side sweeping bang is also something I look for as a way of visually shortening my face. The same goes for needing volume on top to balance my head shape. In all the wig lengths I want to wear I always keep this in mind. Now the fun part. Lets take a look at some of my wigs and why they work for me.

Lia works because she has side fringe and enough volume on top to give me the illusion of an oval face. The bangs on one side gives my face visual width right where I need it..mid face. Fringe/bangs especially a sweeping side fringe will break up the straight line and visual length of my forehead. This is especially important when I want to wear a longer wig.

Ahh my beloved Kahlua. She does the same thing as Lia but even more effortlessly because of the curls. Again visual width on the sides gives the illusion of an oval face. The height on top (mainly from the curls, not permatease) balances out my head to give me an ideal shape. The curly side fringe breaks up the visual space of my forehead and visually shortens the appearance of my face.

Dylan has enough hair and overall volume to work for me. I do play with the layering on the sides to get some volume along mid face. Even though she has an impeccable mono top there is plenty of hair to get some lift. The bangs look best when I let them sweep to the side (to visually shorten my face) as in image 10. Overall this style is the most universally flattering one I have.

Simmer works for me which I’ll admit came as a bit of a surprise. Normally straight longer styles accentuate my straight oblong face. Simmer has volume at the crown that visually helps balance out my head. And there is a beautifully sweeping side fringe and wave to simmer that does two things. The wave pattern gives me just enough width mid face to balance out the length of this style. The sweeping side fringe/bang has a little lift right at the part that gives me just enough volume to again balance her length that would have otherwise drawn the eye downward and would have made my face look longer and droopier.

Finn works on many levels..the volume on top and on the sides (especially mid face) is perfection for me. Finn is long but the visual weight is not at the bottom. The layers get thinner towards the bottom so the visual weight even with a wig of this length and texture is mid face. Again you have a sweeping side bang that visually shortens my face.

Last but not least you have the beautiful Sloane by Tony of Beverly. First of all she doesn’t have a lot of permatease so not a lot of volume on top right out of the box. I really had to work with her. The layering and hair fibers are so light though that I was able to get enough volume on top and still have her look very natural and believable. Her big loose curls/wave pattern also gives some width visually to my face. Notice I have her swept to one side in image 13. This gives me visual width mid face just where I need it. The take away here is that anyone can wear short to long wigs you just have to know your face shape and in my case head shape so you can look for wigs that balance out your unique face shape. These tips are for my face but the concept goes for everyone. Its certainly more fun shopping for wigs when you know what to look for. Enjoy!


You can see all of Kathleen’s posts here as well seeing her talent as an amazing artist at KathleenRyanArt.com.

By CysterWigs Contributor

There are many different forms of hair loss and just as many reasons for each one. Alopecia is the catch all name for hair loss and includes a type caused by traction – or a pulling force. You may be under the assumption that traction alopecia only occurs after wearing a super-tight style that causes the hair to be pulled from the roots. You might also think that traction alopecia is a quick and painful process. However, it can be a very slow burner, gradually eroding the hairline due to years or months of wearing the same tight style.

Signs of Traction Alopecia

● Bumps at roots
● White hair follicles showing
● Redness
● Itchy scalp
● Sores and broken skin
● Thinning
● Hair loss from root especially around hairline and nape
● Widening parts

Prevention

Avoid tight styles or heavy hair pieces. You’ll also want to refrain from wearing the same style consistently for extended periods of time. If you have fine hair, don’t use heavy gels or wax. You’ll also want to stay away from hair pieces that clip in because they could affect the scalp or pull your hair out. Use a soft brush or fingers to style delicate edge hair.

Treatment

Treatment for traction alopecia depends on the extent of hair loss. If caught quickly and the offending styles are halted, then there is a great chance that the hair will return to its normal density and length.

As with most types of hair loss, if it’s not caught early, the follicles can be irreversibly damaged will no longer produce viable hair cells. In this case, there may be permanent bald areas and scarring of the skin depending on the severity.

Depending on the position, traction alopecia can be covered by:

● Surrounding hair
● Wigs
● Or using hair fibers to fill in the area

Traction alopecia is a common condition that doesn’t have to have permanent effects. If you noticed that your hairstyle is too tight or you have significant thinning in particular areas, always seek the help of a professional before it’s too late.

From a customer email:

Let me ask right here before I forget, where exactly are the ear pieces supposed to hit on your head? Should they come down far enough so as to create sideburns or sit higher rather above the ears?

The caps of MOST ready-to-wear wigs will give you basic coverage on the sides of your head, but should NOT be expected to cover your sideburn area 100%. 

ALWAYS plan your color selections with the expectation that some of your biohair may be exposed on the sides. 

Remember: Ready-to-wear wigs are made to fit as many people as possible, so the cast they use to form the wig cap is a general “model” head. Each brand uses a different model head, so each brand will fit a little differently. This also varies from person to person, depending on all sorts of individual factors about the make up of your face, size of your head, and dimensions of your hairline.


This is an excerpt from our CysterWigs Knowledge Base. Check it out on our private site to see over 500 articles all about our store, wigs, and how to wear the hair!