How to revitalize deflated permatease

What you’ll need:

a virgin toothbrush with firm bristles

holding spray (if your wig is synthetic, make sure it’s synthetic safe!)

a styrofoam head

T-pins

sectioning clips or bobby pins

wide-toothed comb

a small pair of sharp scissors

1. Use T-pins to pin the wig right-side-in (so the hair is facing you, not the inside of the cap) on the styrofoam head. I generally put t-pins at the nape, forehead, ear tabs, and crown. Make sure wig is nice and secure before moving on to step 2.

2. Use the wide-toothed comb to gently brush the hair back, directly off the face, to best expose any wefts on the top of the head and / or crown that you want to fluff up.

3. Use sectioning clips or bobby pins to separate the individual wefts.

4. Look on the underside of the weft, near the bottom, where it is sewn into the cap. This is where the permatease lives! Moving in small horizontal strokes, take the virgin toothbrush and “saw” back and forth with gentle pressure. This will help fluff up the permatease again.

5. Continue throughout the areas of the cap that you want to fluff up.

NOTE: It’s okay if it seems like you are fluffing things too much. You can always tame things back down at the end. “More is better” is generally the way to go when you do this.

6. Flip the wig upside-down and spritz with the hair spray. Allow to dry.

7. Remove from styrohead. Now that everything is nice and fluffy, use your fingers to style the wig as you want it to look.

8. Trim any obnoxious fly-aways with the scissors. (Carefully.)

That’s it!

This technique works particularly well with Rene of Paris and Noriko wigs. I use it on my Amal and Cameron wigs to squeak a few more months out of them, since (for example) the biggest issues with ROP wigs tend to be permatease failure issues and not the fibers getting frizzy. Give this a whirl and see if it helps you too! 🙂


This is an excerpt from our CysterWigs Knowledge Base. Check it out on our private site to see over 500 articles all about our store, wigs, and how to wear the hair!

Reducing Wig Shine – by Kathleen

Hi Kathleen here with another easy peasy wig trick. This time to reduce your wigs shine. I will say on the whole I’m not adverse to some shine on my wigs. To me it looks like healthy hair. I’m reminded of all the shampoo commercials and ads I’ve seen over the years and I was always so envious of the models shiny hair 😉. There are times though when the shine is so much even I feel the need to reduce it. Above in image one is my Tony of Beverly Isla. One of my favorites and even in the very even indirect light the image on the left has quite a bit of shine. After applying some good old face powder the image on the right has virtually no shine in the same lighting situation.

I know everyone uses dry shampoo so why do I use face powder you ask? Two reasons I’ve tried dry shampoo and for me it just turned into a big mess. Too much came out (I had a hard time regulating the amount and ended up washing my wig) the smell was too strong for me and I didn’t like the feel of the wig afterwards. I wanted something easy and quick. Perusing youtube I came across this trick. Its super easy. You cannot apply too much and if you wear makeup most folks already have some laying around…Did I mention I was lazy? Lol

In the little video above I demonstrate how easy it is to apply translucent face powder….this time on my High Impact by Gabor. Afterwards I work it in with my hands and a quick light comb through with a wide tooth comb and I’m all set.

Here is High Impact in strong natural light coming from my kitchen windows and there is no shine. 😉

There is a time you want your wig to be especially shine free and that is when photos are going to be taken. A wedding for instance. The one thing you want to avoid are any flash photos. Most professional photographers don’t use a flash in the traditional sense they use a light meter so the photos they take are balanced. The ones guests etc might take using a flash you just want to avoid. Even natural bio hair will come out shiny in that instance. 🤪

Above image 6 illustrates Isla in natural indirect light after I have applied the powder. This is a photo taken from my ipad with the flash off. Absolutely no shine. Experiment with your camera. Take a few photos in different lighting conditions with and without a flash. You can always apply more powder if you aren’t happy with the results. If I know photos might be taken of me I use more powder than I normally would to thoroughly coat those wig fibers. I love the fact the powder gives my wigs more body and that my powder doesn’t smell like alot of dry shampoos do.

Above image 7 illustrates the Isla again in the same lighting conditions but this time I used my flash on my IPad. You can see the shadows on my face are minimized or flattened. You can also see the hair on Isla is still shine free. I’m impressed.

The last test is taking your “powdered” wig outside in strong direct natural sunlight. Image 8 shows Isla in very bright Georgia light (I couldn’t look up and could barely open my eyes the sun was so bright..lol) is there shine? Yes but in this instance it looks like truly healthy hair. It does not look like a wig..at least in my humble opinion it doesn’t. She still has less shine than the first before photo in image one. So the take away here if you’re in a rush or in a pinch and want to reduce your wigs shine go ahead and try your translucent face powder it’s easy peasy. Enjoy!


You can see all of Kathleen’s posts here as well seeing her talent as an amazing artist at KathleenRyanArt.com.

Making Your Part Look Realistic by Kathleen

Hi folks Kathleen here with a couple of tricks and tips on making your wig look more realistic. Image one illustrates one of my wigs after I have applied soft silicone medical tape and removed a few strategic dark hairs along the part.

Image 2 illustrates what I use. Soft Silicone Tape. You can get this at your local drugstore (I get mine at my CVS) or online. Its very soft and I can use the tape over and over again. I just take it off when I wash a wig and replace it when its dry. In a pinch I’ve even used tape from wig to wig when I’ve run out of it. It leaves no residue on your monofilament features so doesn’t damage it at all.

Image 3 illustrates where to place the tape. This is the simplest way I have found to make your part look realistic. The color mimics the color of your scalp so it will look like your wigs hair fibers are growing right out of you head. You’ll want to fiddle with the placement of the tape. Cut a piece the length you’ll need and place on the inside of your wig. Try your wig on and adjust the tape placement if you need to. Usually if I place the tape a little back from the edge of the lace front the effect will look natural. In other words the transition from your skin to the tape won’t be noticeable. I have used makeup on that transition but I have found if I just tweak where I place the tape you won’t notice the transition. I would rather not use make up if I can avoid it. It’s not great for your monofilament features.

So you might be thinking why all the fuss Kathleen? Well image 4 will hopefully answer that question. 😉 In image 4 you can easily see the grid pattern of the lace the dreaded seam between the lace front and mono part and my dark hair peeking through the lace. Still not bad but why leave well enough alone I always say. 😂

Image 5 looks a lot better right? Its really fun to do too.

Remember I said why leave well enough alone? Wellllll..I started putting more tape on my wig because I could see the monofilament if I looked close…several pieces of tape later..lol. Seriously the transition between the part and the rest of the mono top (I used my mono topped Pippa by TOB but this technique works just as well with a mono part wig) and the parted area looks even better now.
Tip: ScarAway could also be used.

I took my tweezers and with my granny glasses (magnifying/craft mirror would be even better) and under very strong task light I very carefully removed a few dark knotted hairs along the part. It didn’t need many removed. Just the ones you could really see from a few feet away. I picked the knots a couple of times with my tweezers to loosen them and then they could easily be unknotted and removed with my tweezers. Be very careful not to pull the lace.

Image 8 illustrates how natural the part looks now even just laying on a table. You can also see how far back I place the tape from the front of the lace. Basically when the knots start getting denser that’s where I place the tape.

The take away here is soft silicone tape is a foolproof/easy/anyone can do it way to make the part on your wig look more realistic. Try it it’s fun…Enjoy!


You can see all of Kathleen’s posts here as well seeing her talent as an amazing artist at KathleenRyanArt.com.

Styling Habits That Ruin a Wig

By Julia

Have you ever looked at one of your wigs and wondered, “What the hell did I do to this thing?” Did it look frizzy, dull, dusty, dry and just fried? If your wigs look like this regularly, you can’t attribute the damage to age or wear and tear. Most likely, the culprit is how you’re styling or caring for your wigs.

The hair on a wig doesn’t grow out of your head, but that doesn’t mean that you can be rough with it or do whatever you want to it. With your bio hair, you know you can’t fry it with heat styling tools, brush it roughly, weigh it down with styling products or use products with damaging ingredients. The same goes for wigs. There are specific things that you should avoid when it comes to styling your wigs. It’s imperative to keep these things in mind so that you can enjoy your wigs for as long as you possibly can.

Here are some bad habits to avoid.

Brushing your wig from the roots

Despite what you may have heard — or have been doing your whole life — you should never brush your wig from the roots to the ends. This method can knot the wig and cause easy breakage. When brushing, carefully start from the ends, working your way up, as this avoids any unwanted knotting that leads to damage. This is one of the most straightforward tips around. Be sure to stick with it to see results.

Using Abrasive Hair Ties

You want to avoid super-tight holders as these will pull your hair and the tension can and will break the hair. It’s preferable to aim for hair ties that will be extra gentle on your delicate strands. These are freaking cute and don’t tug like most traditional hair ties tend to. You can even use a headband or a satin scarf to pull your hair back. Just make sure you avoid headbands with plastic teeth or if you opt for a scarf, don’t tie it too tight.

Brushing Your Wig When It’s Wet

If your hair mistakenly gets wet, brushing it might seem like the normal course of action. But doing so can cause significant damage if you’re not careful. Your wig is in its most fragile state when it’s wet. If you want to straighten things out, use a wide tooth comb to help detangle knots. Also, make sure to spritz on a detangling spray beforehand to help make the process easier.

Excessive Use Of Heat Styling Tools

Tools like flat irons, blow-dryers, and curling wands are undoubtedly good at what they do—but excessive heat styling your heat-friendly wigs can lead to damage. You don’t have to ditch your favorite heat tools altogether. Give them a rest from time to time.

Tying Hair Up Tightly

Sweeping your wig off your neck and into a tight updo may be convenient for sleeping or working out, but it can also cause stress on your mane. You can give your hair a break by opting for low ponytails and swapping out elastics for soft fabric hair ties. Be careful with hairpins, too. They can damage the wig cap if forced into the hair.

Using the Wrong Products on Your Wig

We’ve stressed this a number of times over the years. Don’t use your old styling products that you used on your bio hair on synthetic wigs. Use products that have been specifically formulated for synthetic hair. Products made for real hair may contain ingredients that are way too harsh for synthetic hair. So use shampoos, serums, conditioner and hair sprays that were made for synthetic hair or for human hair if you have human hair wigs.

IN CONCLUSION

When you know better, you do better. Now that you know what bad habits should be avoided, you can start on the path to preserving your wigs better. With extra care and a little prevention, you can protect your wig and make it last from the first hair toss to the very last.


You can see all of Julia’s posts here.

I’ve tried your suggestions but my wig is still slipping :(

Question: Do you condition your existing biohair (if applicable)?

Slick, freshly conditioned biohair is the enemy of wig grippiness.

Your wigs will stay on much better if you refrain from excessive conditioning, particularly at the perimeter of your hair line. Most conditioners have waxes or silicates in them to make the hair feel slick to the touch. This may help you get a comb through it more easily – but it will also cause anything you put on that hair to slip and slide around more than usual.

For the record, I only wash my biohair about 2x a week and only apply conditioner to the tips. Not only is this way healthier for your scalp, but it helps the wigs stay in place better.

Along those same lines, applying a little stiff hair gel to the front and nape of your biohair and allowing it to dry before applying your wig will also help it stay in place better.

If you do not have any biohair – like if you have alopecia universalis or something like that – then you may need to use adhesive tape on some of the monofilament features in lieu of a grip to keep the wig in place. The red tape from Jon Reanu is made for mono tops, the blue tape is for lace fronts. You’ll also want to pick up some Lace Let Go to remove the adhesive without damaging these delicate cap features.


This is an excerpt from our CysterWigs Knowledge Base. Check it out on our private site to see over 500 articles all about our store, wigs, and how to wear the hair!